AHM Manager's Blog

Aviation Heritage Museum Managers Blog

The Managers Page

Hi everyone. Let me know what is on your mind.

ahmmanager
 

Comments 1

Guest - joe on Monday, 21 October 2013 13:39

These WA antique instruments could be of interest to your organisation. Antique Wind gauges/Anemometers listed on ebay Australia at the moment.

HistoricalDines Anemographs. Anemometers/wind gauges from around the 1930’s. Manufacturedby the Dines Company in London. I acquired these about 20 something years ago from a government auction. I used the steel towers that came with them for other purposes, but hung onto the instruments with the intention of stripping the paint off, and then polishing the brass and copper parts of the equipment for display, conversation pieces. I would have hated to see them scrapped for their metal value. Unfortunately my intensions never materialised and it’s time to make space in my workshop. They are stored in 2 large wooden boxes, andaccording to the labels on the side, they were used by the D.C.A at one of theairports in WA, most likely Perth. They appear to have been rebuilt in 1943,then boxed up and placed in a government warehouse until I purchased them. Ithink I still have the drawings from the manufacturer buried somewhere in myshed. For someone with an interest inhistorical instruments, aviation aid’s, or unusual conversation display pieces,now’s your chance. There appears to be enough bits and pieces to make up two sets of instruments. Of course, as I mentioned earlier, there are no towers . (Pick up only)

0
These WA antique instruments could be of interest to your organisation. Antique Wind gauges/Anemometers listed on ebay Australia at the moment. HistoricalDines Anemographs. Anemometers/wind gauges from around the 1930’s. Manufacturedby the Dines Company in London. I acquired these about 20 something years ago from a government auction. I used the steel towers that came with them for other purposes, but hung onto the instruments with the intention of stripping the paint off, and then polishing the brass and copper parts of the equipment for display, conversation pieces. I would have hated to see them scrapped for their metal value. Unfortunately my intensions never materialised and it’s time to make space in my workshop. They are stored in 2 large wooden boxes, andaccording to the labels on the side, they were used by the D.C.A at one of theairports in WA, most likely Perth. They appear to have been rebuilt in 1943,then boxed up and placed in a government warehouse until I purchased them. Ithink I still have the drawings from the manufacturer buried somewhere in myshed. For someone with an interest inhistorical instruments, aviation aid’s, or unusual conversation display pieces,now’s your chance. There appears to be enough bits and pieces to make up two sets of instruments. Of course, as I mentioned earlier, there are no towers . (Pick up only)